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Resilience Blog Posts

Bridging tradition and innovation: Lebanon’s role in EU-funded resilience projects

Lebanon’s pivotal role in EU-funded resilience projects stems from its unique blend of tradition and innovation. From rural wisdom to urban technology, it offers diverse…

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Rewilding: navigating below the tip of the iceberg

By Davide Pettenella and Mauro Masiero (University of Padova, Italy)

In recent times, the tip of a large iceberg called rewilding has been spotted in the vast ocean of nature management and ecological restoration. Profound global and local changes have shaken this iceberg from its glacial platform, sparking ample interest in rewilding approaches. Although most attention is directed to the iceberg’s visible tip, rewilding conceals deeper complexities below the surface. Unveiling hidden depths would help a better understanding of rewilding as an emerging, wicked topic.

What are different pathways to rewilding and how do these approaches build on various ideas of human-nature relationships? We will embark on a journey to navigate these depths onboard a “socioeconomic and policy” submarine. Join our crew to gain a perspective different from – or, at least, complementary to – more ordinary periscopes.

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Resilience thinking: a promising avenue to address the multiple challenges of our time

In the face of global challenges like climate change, biodiversity loss, and population growth, resilience theory offers strategies to strengthen landscapes. Learn how resilience can help navigate these complex issues.

Resilience as a solution for the global triple challenge

Humanity is facing a huge challenge: we need to take care – feed, provide shelter, and health – of more and more people. We need to mitigate climate change while at the same time adapting to the part of it that has already happened. And we have to stop the enormous loss of plants and animals in nature – of the biodiversity on which ecosystems provide ‘environmental services’ to humans.
This “Triple Challenge” isn’t just happening in one place—it is happening all over the world, on land, in the water, and in the air. Think of the Earth as a big puzzle made up of different pieces called “landscapes”, where nature and people interact in multiple, complex, and specific ways. Each landscape has its own unique features, but they all face similar problems.

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Improving biodiversity monitoring in sustainable forest management

Several decades ago, FOREST EUROPE developed a set of Criteria and Indicators (C&I) for SFM, that was improved and revised over the years. Those are publicly available, and countries use it as a very important tool for national and European forest policy, and for the development of their National Forest Inventories. Based on the information obtained by these C&I, the State of Europe’s Forests report is regularly published every five years.  

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Video: Increase biodiversity to strengthen oak resilience

Climate change and its impacts on forest ecosystems, such as the increase of pests, poses a great threat to oaks. Fortunately, several ecological measures are available to improve oak vitality. Parasitoid insects, for example, are natural antagonists of leave-eating caterpillars and can help control forest pests. In the “Oak Resilience” project, the state agency Wald und Holz NRW investigated parasitoids in selected study areas in North-Rhine Westphalia

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Creating mosaic landscapes: integrating vineyards to prevent wildfires and increase resilience

Discover how agroforestry mosaic landscapes in La Plana de Manlleu, Catalonia, Northeastern Spain, with multifunctional vineyard firebreak buffers, prevent wildfires while offering socio-economic benefits and…

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An outdoor classroom in the forest: new “marteloscope” educational site inaugurated for school pupils in Ljubljana

Šmarna gora, the highest hill in the city of Ljubljana, is now more than an iconic landscape monument and a destination for hikers. With the opening of the first “marteloscope” in central Slovenia, its slopes have been transformed into an outdoor classroom for school pupils thanks to an initiative of the EU-funded research and innovation project MULTIPLIERS.

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Resilience of European temperate forests to large and severe disturbances – what have we learned from a continental-scale network of regeneration inventories?

As a result of anthropogenic climate change, forest disturbance regimes are also changing, with individual disturbances often becoming larger and more severe. This may slow down the forest recovery process, or in worst cases, especially under a warmer and drier climate, lead to strong shifts in ecosystem dynamics, or in other words: a loss of forest resilience. Though numerous case studies have examined post-disturbance regeneration in Europe, it’s less clear if we can generalize broad patterns of forest recovery across European temperate forests subjected to large and severe disturbances caused by different agents.

A team of forest researchers from the University of Ljubljana, leveraging the networks created under the European projects I-MAESTRO and FORECO, joined forces with several research institutes across Europe to put together numerous ground-based inventories of regeneration after large and severe disturbances in European temperate forests. The goal was to achieve a more robust understanding on their resilience. We aimed at identifying the main environmental drivers affecting resilience, and how people should manage disturbed forests to support the recovery of their pre-disturbance structure and functionalities.

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Waldbrände – Wenn der Klimawandel Mensch und Natur bedroht

Waldbrandexperte Alexander Held im Gespräch mit G’Scheitholz! über Waldbrand, Prävention und Bekämpfung

Waldbrände prägen seit Jahrhunderten die mediterranen Landschaften in Südeuropa. Aber auch in Mitteleuropa werden Waldbrände immer häufiger und riskanter. Sowohl Klimawandel als auch Trends in der Landnutzung und Landschaftveränderungen führen weltweit zu extremer Feueraktivität und stellen die verschiedenen Regionen vor neue Herausforderungen.

Die Prävention von Waldbränden müsste noch mehr zur Zielsetzung werden, meint Waldbrandexperte Alexander Held vom European Forest Insitute im Gespräch mit dem österreichischen Klimaschutz-podcast G’Scheitholz!. Zwar können wir nicht alle Feuer verhindern, doch eine gute Prävention kann dafür sorgen, dass die Feuer, die auftreten, beherrschbar bleiben für die Feuerwehr. Das bedeutet beispielsweise die Brandlast, also die Menge an Brennmaterial, an Waldwegen zu reduzieren und mehr Pufferzonen zu schaffen.

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