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Resilience Blog Posts

Expecting the unexpected: how to manage forest landscapes in a highly uncertain future?

In past blog posts we have been discussing how forest landscapes can be seen as interconnected and functional complex networks – and shown how network analysis can be combined with modelling and forest management. But is the so-called functional network approach really an efficient way to optimize forest landscape management and to promote ecological resilience in the face of unexpected global change stresses?

When we go hiking in the mountains, we know that before reaching an appealing and gratifying view we often need to walk up a few hundred meters inside a forest. Sounds natural, it has always been this way. We have cities, crop fields, grasslands, forests, rocky mountain peaks, etc. Forests are intrinsically part of our cultural landscape, and it is normal to think they will always be. Although such landscapes look simple, when we disentangle each single element, we realise that it is a very complex socio-ecological network, with both human and biophysical processes linked across different spatial and temporal scales.

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SUPERB forest restoration journey comes to life with the launch of new project website

Funded by the European Commission to promote large-scale forest restoration in support of the EU Green Deal, the new Horizon 2020 project SUPERB, coordinated by EFI, has created quite a buzz on social media since its beginning in December 2021. With 36 consortium members, 90 associated partners, €20 million in EU funds and €90 million in in-kind contributions, SUPERB is likely to be the largest transnational forest restoration project globally.

Now, the enormous wealth of knowledge that will be generated by SUPERB’s restoration experts, as well as the latest updates on its multifold restoration activities, can be accessed online all in one place at forest-restoration.eu.

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New Policy Brief out now: Challenges and solutions for European forests and related value chains in times of climate change

How can we increase the sustainability and resilience of our European forests and related value chains in times of climate change? I-Maestro (Innovative forest management…

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The city of contrasts: Learning about forests and trees in Industriewald and Rheinelbepark in Gelsenkirchen

Establishing the first marteloscope in an Urban Forest and discovering the transition of Gelsenkirchen

How do marteloscopes – these forest demonstration sites, where all trees are mapped and measured – and Gelsenkirchen, a city located in the so-called Ruhrpott fit together? You might be surprised that after being known as the “City of Thousand Fires” characterised by the coal, iron, and steel industry, and being a target of several air raids during World War II, Gelsenkirchen went through different economic and social changes. To boost its attractiveness for citizens, the city is now “shaping” its sustainability, investing in solar energy and converting numerous former mining sites into small city parks and urban forests [1]. The city of Gelsenkirchen is also a partner in the CLEARINGHOUSE project, which connects China and Europe and explores the potential of Urban Forests for more liveable cities. And as part of this big international project, we – four researchers from European Forest Institute’s Bonn Office – established two new marteloscopes in the Urban Forest in Gelsenkirchen. This was not only an interesting experience because they were the first marteloscope sites we set up in urban forests, but also because of the vegetation and the fact, that these forests are not used for wood production.

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Exchange of Experts in Polen- Teamwork at its best

Wenn über 100 motivierte Waldbrandexperten von Heute und Morgen aus sieben Nationen in Polen zusammenkommen, um bei vollem Einsatz drei Tage lang, bei einem Exchange of Experts (EoE) verschiedene Waldbrandbekämpfungs-Taktiken zu üben, dann auch noch entgegen der Vorhersage das Wetter mitspielt, ist das Wochenende perfekt gelaufen!

Zwischen dem 20-22 Mai fand in Gołąbki (Staatswald Toruń) das erste International Forest Camp in Polen statt. Ziel des Workshops war es Techniken und Taktiken zur Bekämpfung von Waldbränden zu trainieren. Zunächst in verschiedenen Trainingsstationen am Freitag. An den beiden folgenden Tagen wurden unter Anleitung von internationalen Waldbrandexperten verschiedene Aspekte von Waldbrand- Szenarien nachgestellt und die Teams aus ganz Europa mussten das gelernte Wissen anwenden. Dabei konnten die Experten direktes Feedback geben und die Teams dadurch (wenn nötig) Ihre geplante Strategie anpassen.

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Equipping Irish forest owners, foresters and forestry students to manage diverse forests

A new forest training network aims to enhance confidence and ability in managing a diverse range of forests in Ireland, writes Jonathan Spazzi, Teagasc Forestry Development Officer. Teagasc has partnered with EFI to make marteloscope training programmes and resources available to forest owners, foresters, students and other user groups.

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Between Theory and Reality Check: PyroLife trainings in Cyprus

Written by Isabeau Ottolini

Isabeau Ottolini is an Early Stage Researcher within the European ITN project, PyroLife. She is researching Community-based Communications on extreme wildfires. She will spend her secondment at the EFI Bonn Office.

Between 8-14 April, the EU funded PyroLife project held two training events on the island of Cyprus. This blog post shares what we, as Early Stage Researchers, did and learnt during the Risk Communication workshop and the in-field module of the Making Change in Wildfire Management: Science Policy Interaction training.

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International Event: Fostering Innovation Towards a More Sustainable Forest Sector in Europe

ROSEWOOD4.0 harnesses digital solutions and boosts knowledge transfer to connect multiple actors along the forest value chain to reinforce the sustainability of wood mobilisation and the forestry sector in Europe.

The European Forest Institute’s Mediterranean Facility together with Steinbeis Europa Zentrum (SEZ) are hosting an exciting international event on 14-15 June: Fostering Innovation Towards a More Sustainable Forest Sector in Europe. This is the final two-day hybrid event of the EU ROSEWOOD4.0 project, focusing on digitalisation in forestry, which will be held at the Sant Pau Art Nouveau site in Barcelona, Spain, and will also be streamed online.

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Exploring the world of investigative journalism: Some takeaways from the panel session at the International Forest Policy Meeting (#IFPM4) 

From wildfires to deforestation in the tropics, journalism brings various forest-related issues to the public attention. Yet, one of the main concerns from the scientific communities is the issue of ‘speed over accuracy’, where many news journalists fail to report complex topics without providing contextual background. Particularly in the digital age, when the speed of news is faster than ever before, there is even more pressure on today’s news industry to report forest-related issues in a timely and accurate manner.  

The good news is that there is a wide variety of journalism practices that take serious consideration of the process for inquiry. In particular, investigative journalists take a unique approach to exploring the issues in depth before jumping to a quick conclusion. Many investigative journalists spend years following a single issue by working closely with scientific experts and mastering the skills to wrangle complex (and often unstructured) data to identify the links that no one has ever addressed in the news. 

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Is European forest management out of alignment with natural patterns in disturbances?

by Joshua Brow, University of Vermont

European forests are in trouble. “Not because they’re being lost,” says University of Vermont scientist William Keeton. “Europe, actually, is greener and more heavily forested now than it has been in centuries.” But many of the continent’s forests are suffering major insect outbreaks, forest disease problems, increasing frequencies of wind-storms, and more-intense fires.
To help give forest managers and policymakers new options, Keeton and a large team of European scientists completed an extensive, multi-year study of forests in thirteen countries across the continent.

Their results show that most current forest management in Europe doesn’t imitate the patterns of nature—specifically, the complex patterns created by natural disturbances that leave behind a mosaic of tree types, ages, and sizes; standing and downed dead wood; and highly variable, resilient landscapes.

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