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Category: fire

Es geht nur gemeinsam: Neue Perspektiven für Waldbrandmanagement in Baden-Württemberg

Anlässlich des Starts des WKR-Projekts (Waldbrand-Klima-Resilienz) und der Gründung einer “Modellregion Waldbrandmanagement“ in Baden-Württemberg hat die Forstliche Versuchs- und Forschungsanstalt Baden-Württemberg (FVA) Medien- und Pressevertreter*innen am 25. September 2020 nach Bruchsal in die Landesfeuerwehrschule und anschließend in den Hardtwald eingeladen, um neue Wege im Waldbrandmanagement vorzustellen. Gemeinsam werden Handlungsempfehlungen für Waldbrandprävention und -Management entwickelt, denn die wachsende Gefahr für Wald und Vegetationsbrände stellen Waldbesitzer*innen, Forstverwaltungen und Feuerwehren vor massive Herausforderungen. In dem Bewusstsein der größer werdenden Probleme ist im Rahmen des WKR-Projekts in Baden-Württemberg eine Modellregion festgelegt worden, in der neue Ansätze des Waldbrandmanagements und Möglichkeiten der Kooperation aller betroffenen Akteure geschaffen werden.

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Towards improved disturbance risk management in European forests: serving the needs and building on positive experiences of different countries

Day 2 of the SURE conference

Where are shortcomings in effective disturbance risk management in different European Countries? How can we move from often short-term decisions to long-term oriented disturbance mitigation and resource use in policy-making and practice to create a more resilient forest sector? How can the various actors involved in implementing measures for prevention and preparedness be better supported in view of future disturbance events? How do both policy makers and practitioners assess the importance of cross-sectoral and cross-country knowledge exchange and learning?

We discussed these questions with more than 40 policy makers and some practitioners from 17 countries on the 27th of August as part of the second day of the virtual conference of the SURE project. A Policy Brief distributed beforehand, provided a synthesis on natural disturbance risk management based on science, practice and policy perspectives. The key messages from the first day of the conference were also an inspiration for the discussion: Alex Giurca presented a graphic reporting capturing the issues discussed on day 1. Christoph Hartebrodt, based on his knowledge on the European Forest Risk Facility initiative, provided another perspective on the topics covered. After presenting the activities and research done during three years of SURE, an interactive session with policy perspectives on risk management paradigms gathered views from Germany, Slovenia, Italy, Switzerland, Ireland, Austria, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the Czech Republic. 

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Neue Perspektiven für Wald- und Feuermanagement im Klimawandel

“Waldbrand-Klimawandel-Resilienz”. Dreijähriges Verbundprojekt zwischen EFI und FVA offiziell gestartet.

Der Sommer ist brandgefährlich – für die Wälder. Wenn es brennt, bekommt die Thematik viel Aufmerksamkeit. Eventuell kommen Löschflugzeuge zum Einsatz, und auch die Feuerwehren stehen vor massiven Herausforderungen, die Flammen einzudämmen.

Dabei (zu) wenig im Fokus stehen das aktive Feuermanagement und die Diskussion über präventive Maßnahmen, um die Ausbreitung der Feuer möglichst kontrollieren zu können. Und genau da setzt das vom Waldklimafond der Bundesregierung geförderte Projekt „Waldbrand-Klimawandel-Resilienz“(kurz WKR) an.

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“We need segregation with integration, and integration with segregation”

An Interview with Natalia Lukina, Forest Ecology and Productivity Centre, Russian Academy of Science

Forests are among our planet’s most important human life-supporting ecosystems, and we have many expectations with regards to the ecosystem services they provide. But: How do major global challenges such as climate change and biodiversity loss affect forests globally, and what can forest governance and management do? How can we deal with rising and changing demands for forest products and ecosystem services due to global population and economic growth, and urbanization?   

In order to discuss these questions, the conference “Governing and managing forests for multiple ecosystem services” brought together policymakers, practitioners and academic researchers from different fields on 26-28 February in Bonn. During this event, EFI in collaboration with the documentary filmmaker Patrick Augenstein, interviewed, Natalia Lukina, Forest Ecology and Productivity Centre, Russian Academy of Science.

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Gefährliche Mixtur: Warum das Waldbrandrisiko im Frühling so hoch ist

Ein Beitrag des „Verbund Vegetationsbrand

Der Waldbrandgefahrenindex des DWD für den 21. April 2020

Nachrichtenportale und das Radio berichten davon, und auch die Wettervorhersage der Tagesschau warnt zur besten Einschaltquote vor der derzeit hohen Waldbrandgefahr. Dies ist üblicherweise ein Thema, was eher in den heißen Sommermonaten besprochen wird – doch Waldbrände halten sich genauso wenig an Monatskalender wie an Ländergrenzen. Gerade in diesen Tagen ist das Risiko für Waldbrände enorm hoch. Neben der Zeit im Hochsommer (Juli/August) gilt besonders für April eine erhöhte Waldbrandgefahr.

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How and why prescribed burning mitigates bushfire losses

by Neil Burrows and Rick Sneeuwjagt

Considerable publicity is recently being given to an article by titled “Why prescribed burns don’t stop wildfires” (published in Sydney Morning Herald, in New Matilda, and also WAToday on 22 January 2020), written by a botanist and a molecular biologist from Curtin University in Western Australia. They argue against the use of fuel reduction burning in bushfire management because it does not “stop bushfires”.

The article worries us, because in our opinion it could give rise to dangerous fire management policies, a continuation of the cycle of devastating bushfires in Australia, and to further losses of lives and beautiful forests.

Thus we decided to write a reply to the publication, to clarify some facts and spread important information on prescribed burning based on scientific research and practical experience.

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Bushfires, Wildfires and Damaging fires – Rinse and Repeat or Risk Reduction and Resilience?

Dr. Peter F. Moore, Forestry Officer, Forest Fire Management & Disaster Risk Reduction, in the FAO-Forestry Department originates from Australia and posted the following statement in response to the ongoing wildfire crisis:

“In January 1994 there were four fire related deaths, hundreds of thousands of hectares burnt and fingers of fire crept into the city of Sydney.

  • Parliament, the cabinet and the coroner held inquiries and released reports on the reasons, causes of death and the possible means of avoiding the same problems in the future.

On Christmas Day 2001, the concerns of fire authorities in New South Wales were realised – in full measure. The lead-up to summer conditions had been drier than normal. December 25, 2001 was hot with temperatures well over 30C; very low humidity of less than 15 per cent; and winds from the west. These bush fires burnt nearly 700,000ha, with 115 houses and many other buildings destroyed and scores of others damaged.

  • And Parliament and the coroner held inquiries and released reports on the reasons and the causes …
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Networks of trust – the foundation for wildfire management

Written by Laura Nikinmaa & Maria Schlossmacher

Imagine having a team of chefs cooking Eggs Benedict. One of them has only ever made omelets; the other one has all the ingredients but no recipe. The third one knows how to do it, but they have been forbidden to cook anything else than scrambled eggs by the owner of the restaurant. On top of everything, they are not talking to one another because they are all competing for promotion. The outcome? You guessed it, anything but Eggs Benedict, the restaurant owner is enraged, and none of the chefs gets a promotion.

While the restaurant world is known to be fiery, the actual world of wildfires is straight up in flames. We have seen abnormally active fire season in 2019 in many countries. Poland had almost three times more fires compared to the 10-year average this year, Germany more than five times more, and France more than seven times more (EFFIS). The cherry on top was the United Kingdom, which had eight times more fires in 2019 than in the 10-year average. It was therefore fitting that the SURE project workshop (“pro-active fire management”) was organized back to back with the England and Wales Wildfire Forum’s (EWWF) Wildfire Conference from 20th to 22nd of November in Cardiff, Wales. The EWWF conference had more than 180 participants from 14 different countries, out of which almost 50 stayed to participate in the SURE workshop on the 22nd. The theme of the conference was “Manage the fuel – Reduce the Risk”. The speakers consisted of experts from practice and research, from fire and rescue services to forest administrates, and the topics varied from practical examples to the latest knowledge we have on wildfire behavior.

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EFI Bonn looking for a PhD Researcher on Perceptions of Wildfire Risks

The European Forest Institute (EFI) is now looking for a PhD Researcher on understanding perceptions of wildfire risks and related land management at its Bonn, Germany, office.

Deadline for the application is 16 December 2019 COB.

The objectives of the research are:
• To analyse perceptions of fire risk and related concepts of fire (risk) management in different regional and sectoral contexts across Europe amongst a) fire and land management experts, b) land owners and managers in different regional settings;
• To enhance learning and generate transferable knowledge on risk and its management through interconnecting experts across regional contexts.

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Disaster Risk Management via app?

The European Commission’s Disaster Risk Management Knowledge Centre and the Directorate General for Research and Innovation have developed a platform, Gaps Explorer, that collects pre-analysed information on recent and ongoing Disaster Risk Management (DRM) projects and provides recommendations for actions to three groups: practitioners, policy makers and scientists.

The first pilot was developed on Forest Fires. This is a major hazard throughout Europe, producing large environmental and economic losses and having an impact on human lives. Effective forest fire management and decision-making requires science-based information. The analysis of the knowledge, methodologies and technologies produced in the last two decades opens up new perspectives for enhanced forest fire risk management in the face of climate change, social and cultural trends and growth dynamics.

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