France on the barricade against deforestation

France has just adopted a new national strategy to restrict the import of forest-related products from areas that struggle with deforestation. Contrary to the more positive trends in Europe, the global forest area has decreased by 129 million hectares between 1990 and 2015, according to FAO data. This corresponds to twice the surface of France.

The strategy focuses on three main topics and three regions. The first and biggest problem is the cattle ranching and large-scale soy production in parts of Latin America, leading to vast deforested areas. The import of soy from that region to Europe represents 60% of the import with a high deforestation risk. The main issue in South-East Asia is the replacement of tropical rain forest by unsustainably managed oil palm plantations, accounting for 12% of the high-risk imported goods. Finally, the challenge facing West-Africa is cocoa production, which represents 8% of the problematic import.

These three goods together account for 80% of the deforestation-related import to the EU. The battle against illegally logged timber, thanks to initiatives such as the EUTR, FLEGT, REDD+ and GTTN, is in full swing. We should however not forget that the majority of global deforestation is caused by other consumable goods.

The strategy comprises 17 planned, built around bilateral cooperation, developing road maps and restricting imports from regions at risk of deforestation. The full strategy can be consulted here (in French).

 

 

“REDDy for more?” Join EFI’s side event for COP23 and explore the future of global forest governance

Join our panel-audience discussion on the possible future of global forest governance focusing on the tropics on Saturday the 11th of November 2017, 13.00 – 15.00 in the new premises of EFI Bonn at Platz der Vereinten Nationen 7 in Bonn. Strong current trends and likely future scenarios, which may build on but also go beyond REDD+ initiatives will be key themes.

The climate deliberations of previous years have clearly shown that forests are a crucial aspect of global approaches to climate change policy, esp. in the tropics. Persistent deforestation and forest degradation cause a huge amount of CO2 emissions, while growing forest stock, sustainable forest management as well as the use of wood-based products and materials are capable of mitigating emissions from multiple sources.